PRESIDENT DUTERTE APPOINTS VICE PRESIDENT ROBREDO AS HUDCC CHAIR

          President Rodrigo Roa Duterte appointed Vice President Ma. Leonor G. Robredo as the 11th Chairperson of the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC) on 7 July 2016. 

          In her statement, Vice President Robredo thanked the President and stated, “Mas mapaglilingkuran natin ang ating mga kababayang walang tahanan at maipagpapatuloy natin ang ating pangakong itulak ang kaunlaran at kaginhawaan para sa ating mga kapus palad na kababayan.”

          “Ang pagtugon sa mga pangangailangan sa pabahay ay matagal nang adhikain ni Jesse.  Maisasakatuparan ito at mabibiyayaan ang mga nasa laylayan sa pakikipagtulungan ng lahat.”

          Vice President Robredo took her Oath before President Duterte on 12 July 2016.

          Under her administration, the Vice President “wants to address the 1.4-million housing backlog and streamline government processes in the shelter sector.”

          Aside from HUDCC, Vice President Robredo is also the Chairperson of the Board of the Home Development Mutual Fund (Pag-IBIG Fund), Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB), National Housing Authority (NHA), National Home Mortgage Finance Corporation (NHMFC), and Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC); and Vice Chairperson of the Board of the Home Guaranty Corporation (HGC).

 

       

Housing Project for Employees of the Key Shelter Agencies (KSAs).  The Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC) Chairman, Atty. Chito M. Cruz, and the Heads of the six (6) attached KSAs, namely, (from left to right) Home Guaranty Corporation (HGC) Officer-In-Charge Corazon G. Corpuz, Social Housing Finance Corporation (SHFC) President Maria Ana R. Oliveros, National Housing Authority (NHA) General Manager Atty. Sinforoso R. Pagunsan, Home Development Mutual Fund (HDMF) or Pag-IBIG Fund Chief Executive Officer Atty. Darlene Marie B. Berberabe, Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB) Commissioner and CEO Atty. Antonio M. Bernardo, and National Home Mortgage Finance Corporation (NHMFC) President Dr. Felixberto U. Bustos Jr., sign a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to develop the 1.309-hectare property of NHA as a housing project for the employees of the KSAs located in PRTC Phase 2, Kalayaan Avenue, Pasay City.  The housing project will construct eight 5-storey buildings that will generate 480 units.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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VICE PRESIDENT ROBREDO DELIVERS KEYNOTE ADDRESS AT THE 2016 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON URBAN DEVELOPMENT

(Posted: July 15, 2016)

Vice  President Leni Robredo delivered the keynote address and closing remarks during the 2016 International Conference on Urban Development, held at the Sofitel Philippine Plaza Manila on 13 July 2016.

In her keynote address, the Vice President highlighted...

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PAG-IBIG REPORTS P20.2B NET INCOME

(POSTED: January 26, 2016)

Pag-IBIG Fund held its State of the Fund Address (SOFA) on Tuesday (Jan. 26) to report on its accomplishments in 2015.

“Pag-IBIG Fund is the Filipino worker’s fund. Our responsibility is to promote savings and to invest in housing. I am glad that Pag-IBIG Fund, led by President and CEO Atty. Darlene Marie B. Berberabe, kept up with President

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RENT CONTROL ACT EXTENDED FOR ANOTHER 2 YEARS 

(POSTED: January 5, 2016)

The Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC) has extended the rent control regulation for residential units occupied by low-income brackets for another two years until December 2017.

Effective January 1, 2016 until December 31, 2017, the rent of any residential unit  ...
 

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Q AND A ON THE EXTENSION OF RENT CONTROL

   1.      WHAT IS THE LEGAL BASIS FOR EXTENDING RENT CONTROL?

Rent Control under Republic Act 9653 was approved on July 14, 2009 and expired on December 31, 2013. Upon expiration, the law mandated HUDCC to:

1.1       Continue the regulation of the rental of certain residential units, determine the period of regulation and its subsequent
             extensions, if warranted, determine the residential units covered and adjust the allowable limit on rental increases per
             annum;
1.2       Conduct every three (3) years from the effectivity of the Act, a review of its implementation and study on rental regulation,
               and submit its recommendation to Congress whether to continue regulating or deregulating; and
1.3       Formulate and implement a two-year transition program, which will provide for safety measures to cushion the impact in

             the event of a regulation-free rental to housing market.

  2.        WHAT DID HUDCC DO WHEN THE LAW EXPIRED ON DECEMBER 31, 2013?

The HUDC Council issued Resolution No. 2 in December 2013 extending the Rent Control for another two years at status quo
rates of not more than 7% per annum for:

2.1       Renters in Metro Manila and highly urbanized areas whose monthly rates are P10,000 and below; and
2.2       Renters in other areas whose monthly rental rates are P5,000 and below,

As long as the unit is occupied by the same lessee.

The Council’s decision was based on the preliminary study of the Philippine Statistical Research and Training Institute of the Philippine Statistical Authority, as follows: 

2.3       There are about 1.5 million renters nationwide based on the 2012 Family Income and Expenditure Survey; 
2.4       97% of said renters are renting monthly at P10,000 and below.

The status quo was adopted inasmuch as there is a need for further data and validation, such as the Wholesale Price Index for construction materials, for a comprehensive study.

  3.        RENT CONTROL WILL AGAIN EXPIRE ON DECEMBER 31, 2015.  WHAT HAS HUDCC DONE ABOUT THIS?

The HUDC Council issued Resolution No. 1 in June 2015 which extended Rent Control for a period of another two (2) years -
from 01 January 2016 to 31 December 2017.

  4.        WHAT UNITS ARE COVERED BY THE RENT CONTROL EXTENSION?

4.1       Scope of Coverage.  The Rent Control covers the following residential units nationwide, whose monthly rent is P10,000
             and below:
             A. Apartments;
             B. Houses and/or land on which another’s dwelling is located and used for residential purposes; and
             C. Buildings or parts thereof, which are being used solely as dwelling units, boarding houses, dormitories, rooms
                  and bed spaces.
4.2
       Exclusion.  As provided in RA 9653, rented units, which are used as motels, motel rooms, hotels, and hotel rooms 
             including  those used for home industries, retail stores or other business purposes if the owner thereof and his or her
             family actually live therein and use it principally for dwelling purposes are not covered by the Act.

  5.        WHAT ARE THE NEW RATES OF INCREASE UNDER RENT CONTROL?
             The increase in the monthly rental rate of any residential unit shall not be more than:

5.1       Four percent (4%) annually for those paying a monthly rent/ranging from P1.00 to P3,999.00; and
5.2       Seven percent (7%) for those paying a monthly rent of P4,000.00 up to P10,000.00 for as long as the unit is occupied

             by the same lessee.

The respective Housing and Urban Development Committees of both Houses of Congress have approved/confirmed the 
above recommendations.

  6.        WHY ARE THERE TWO TIERS NOW COMPARED TO RA 9653?

Provide lower rates of increase to low income renters.  The subsequent study done by the Philippine Statistical Research 
and Training Institute looked at the census on rental units, prevailing rental rates, monthly inflation rate on rentals of the 
immediately preceding year, and rental price index.

The study showed that out of the 1.5 million renters in the country, 1.27 million (82%) are renting at less than P4,000 monthly.  
With regard to the rate of increase, the study recommended to adopt the inflation rate on rentals of the immediately preceding
year, which at 2014 was at 4.1%.

Since Rent Control is intended to assist the low income families who are renting, it was decided to lower the rate of increase to
4% for those renting below P4,000 a month.

But should not disenfranchise those already covered.  Since the existing Rent Control covers those who are renting up to 
P10,000, the Council resolved to continue covering them at the existing rate of 7% as provided in RA 9653.

  7.       WHAT ARE THE OTHER PROVISIONS OF RA 9653 THAT REMAIN EFFECTIVE?

7.1       REQUIRED ADVANCE RENT AND DEPOSIT
             Every lessor is allowed to impose not more than one (1) month advance rent and not more than two (2)
             months deposit, which shall be deposited in a bank under the lessor’s account name during the entire duration of the
             lease agreement. Any interest that shall accrue therein shall be returned to the lessee at the expiration of the lease
             contract.

7.2       FORFEITURE OF DEPOSITS
             The lessor has the right to forfeit a portion or all of the one month deposit including the interest earned in the event the
             lessee is unable to settle rent, electric, telephone, water or such other utility bills or destroys any house components and
             accessories. 

7.3       GROUNDS FOR JUDICIAL EJECTMENT
             The lessor has the right to eject the lessee on the following grounds:

A. The lessee assigns the lease or sub-leases the unit, without the written consent of the owner/lessor;
B. The renter has accumulated arrears in rental equivalent to three (3) months;
C. After the expiration of the lease period, the lessor/owner has a legitimate need to repossess the property for his/her    
     own use or that of his/her family as a residential unit, provided that the renter was notified three months in advance;
D. The lessor/owner needs to make necessary repairs on the leased premises which is the subject of an existing order
     of condemnation by appropriate authorities concerned in order to make the premises safe and habitable; and
E. The lease contract has expired.
     The lessee cannot be ejected on the ground that the leased premises have been sold or mortgaged to a third      
     person regardless of whether the lease or mortgage is registered or not.

7.4       PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION OF ANY PROVISIONS OF THE RENT CONTROL ACT

Any person found guilty of violating any provision of the act shall be fined of not less Twenty Five Thousand Pesos 
(P25,000) nor more than Fifty Thousand Pesos (P50,000) or imprisonment of not less than one (1) month and one (1)
day to not more than six (6) months, or both.